The Blue Boar

Centrally situated in the Market Place, this is a lovely old 17th century pub that has now also become available as a bed and breakfast. It offers brilliant real ales and some old world charm.

History of the Blue Boar

This pub was built by Theophilius Lacey, following a lease granted on 3 November 1691. By 1724 the property included not only a pub but also a dwelling house, malthouse and stables. The history of the inn, however, can often be tracked through court or police records.

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries several incidents requiring police or court involvement, largely over drunken brawls (once ending in a death in a nearby street) have been associated with the pub. The Blue Boar also served (quite badly) as a place to house prisoners of the guard house next door, on two recorded incidents. On both these instances, in 1827 and 1844, the prisoner escaped via the window. A raid on the pub in 1827 to catch after-hours drinkers found 40 or 50 drunk customers inside, and not a sober man there. In 1861 the pub suffered a botched attempt at the theft of its curtains, but the man was caught as he returned to the pub having failed to sell the curtains at the Black Swan. In 1868 a constable came to dispel an instance of a tailor attempting to start a fight. He did so by unscrewing the man’s wooden leg.

In the early 20th century, the pub was plagued by several floods. In spite of these many incidents, however, the inn continues to function today as a pub and bed and breakfast.

For more information on the history of the pub, see The Historic Inns of Frome.